History, Processing, Types and Health Benefits of Indian Yogurt

Year : 2024 | Volume : | : | Page : –
By

Suman Bala

Manpreet Kaur

Shivani Gupta

  1. Assistant Professor Department of Home Science, Food Nutrition & Dietetics, Kurukshetra University Haryana India
  2. Research Scholar Department of Home Science, Food Nutrition & Dietetics Kurukshetra University Haryana India
  3. Research Scholar Department of Home Science, Food Nutrition & Dietetics Kurukshetra University Haryana India

Abstract

Yogurt is a food which is nutrient rich and it is produced after the milk bacterial fermentation. Yogurt should have 3.25% milk fat and 8.25% milk solids non fat and the titrable acidity of at least 0.9%, which is expressed as lactic acid. Before adding bulky flavoring additives, the USDA yogurt criteria specify that the yogurt must satisfy the composition requirements of milk fat and MSNF. The data used in this research paper has taken from various secondary sources like journals, review articles and website etc. which helps to understand the history, manufacturing, types and health aspects of the yogurt. The standard procedure for making yogurt consists of changing the milk original composition, pasteurizing the yogurt mixture, fermenting it at temperature between 40-45°C , cooling it down and then adding flavours and fruit. Different types of yogurts are found in the market like fruit yogurt, French style, non-diary, drinkable, organic and probiotic yogurt which have many health benefits. Probiotics found in yogurt have an antitumor property that’s why it prevents the growth and development of tumors. Yogurt also improves insulin resistance and reduces the risk of Type-2 diabetes. Lactobacillus gasseri found in yogurt has positive health effects on peripheral blood flow, autonomic nerve activity, and skin condition. The abstract highlights yogurt’s nutritional profile, production process, and health benefits. Emphasizing the importance of meeting USDA criteria, it explores yogurt’s diverse types and therapeutic properties, including its role in cancer prevention, diabetes management, and cardiovascular health. Lactobacillus gasseri’s impact on various bodily functions is also discussed.

Keywords: Yogurt, Pasteurization, stabilizers, flavours, Bacterial- culture.

How to cite this article: Suman Bala, Manpreet Kaur, Shivani Gupta. History, Processing, Types and Health Benefits of Indian Yogurt. Research & Reviews : Journal of Dairy Science & Technology. 2024; ():-.
How to cite this URL: Suman Bala, Manpreet Kaur, Shivani Gupta. History, Processing, Types and Health Benefits of Indian Yogurt. Research & Reviews : Journal of Dairy Science & Technology. 2024; ():-. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/rrjodst/article=2024/view=145867





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Ahead of Print Subscription Original Research
Volume
Received April 2, 2024
Accepted April 15, 2024
Published May 13, 2024