Agro- residue Pretreatment Tools and Techniques: A Detailed review

Year : 2024 | Volume :13 | Issue : 01 | Page : 23-33
By

Pragya Yadav

A K Sarma

  1. Research Scholar Department of Biotechnology, I. K. Gujral Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar Punjab India
  2. Scientist E Department of Biotechnology, Sardar Swaran Singh National Institute of Bio-Energy Kapurthala Punjab India

Abstract

This review examines the significance of biomass pre-treatment in facilitating efficient biofuel production from lignocellulosic materials. Different methods of pre-treatment, such as acid, alkaline, liquid hot water, ionic liquids, organosolv, ozonolysis, wet oxidation, steam explosion, ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX), carbon dioxide explosion, and biological pretreatment, are examined in terms of their underlying principles, benefits, and drawbacks. Acid pretreatment effectively hydrolyzes hemicellulose but suffers from equipment corrosion and high operational costs, while alkaline pretreatment removes lignin but requires long residence times and results in irrecoverable salts. Physicochemical methods such as steam explosion and AFEX offer economical options with varying effectiveness in degrading lignin and hemicellulose. Biological pretreatments are energy-efficient but have a slower hydrolysis rate.
Overall, this review provides insights into the diverse array of biomass pre-treatment methods, guiding researchers and practitioners in selecting the most suitable approach for efficient biofuel production. It emphasizes the importance of disrupting the complex lignocellulosic structure while considering factors such as cost-effectiveness, environmental impact, and process efficiency. By understanding the advantages and limitations of each method, stakeholders can make informed decisions to advance sustainable biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass.
This comprehensive review underscores the critical role of biomass pre-treatment in overcoming structural barriers to bio-conversion processes. By evaluating various methods against criteria such as carbohydrate degradation, inhibitor formation, and cost-effectiveness, it offers a nuanced understanding of the complexities involved. This knowledge is essential for optimizing biofuel production while minimizing environmental impact. This comprehensive review underscores the critical role of biomass pre-treatment in overcoming structural barriers to bio-conversion processes. By evaluating various methods against criteria such as carbohydrate degradation, inhibitor formation, and cost-effectiveness, it offers a nuanced understanding of the complexities involved. This knowledge is essential for optimizing biofuel production while minimizing environmental impact. Drawing from botanical insights, the review delves into the intricate composition of lignocellulosic materials, highlighting the significance of disrupting the synergistic network of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin for efficient bio-conversion.

Keywords: Biomass, Hemicellulose, Cellulose, Lignin, Treatment

[This article belongs to Research & Reviews : Journal of Botany(rrjob)]

How to cite this article: Pragya Yadav, A K Sarma. Agro- residue Pretreatment Tools and Techniques: A Detailed review. Research & Reviews : Journal of Botany. 2024; 13(01):23-33.
How to cite this URL: Pragya Yadav, A K Sarma. Agro- residue Pretreatment Tools and Techniques: A Detailed review. Research & Reviews : Journal of Botany. 2024; 13(01):23-33. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/rrjob/article=2024/view=145683





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Regular Issue Subscription Original Research
Volume 13
Issue 01
Received March 14, 2024
Accepted April 21, 2024
Published May 9, 2024