The Impact of Dietary Components on Lactation: A Critical Review

Year : 2024 | Volume :01 | Issue : 01 | Page : 31-36
By

Rachana Jagadeesh

Rohit Kumar

Neelesh Kumar Maurya

  1. Student Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida Uttar Pradesh India
  2. Student Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida 201310, Uttar Pradesh India
  3. Assistant Professor Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida 201310, Uttar Pradesh India

Abstract

Infant growth and well-being depend on an adequate and species-specific amount of nutrients, antibodies, and immunological components, which are provided by human breastfeeding, the cornerstone of newborn sustenance and development However, some moms struggle with producing inadequate milk, which can put the health advantages of nursing for both mother and child in jeopardy and cause stress, anxiety, and perhaps early weaning. This review discusses the fascinating idea that food changes might be a healthy, natural way to promote breastfeeding. Researcher will carefully review the available scientific data about the potential effects of several dietary groups—such as grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables, herbs, spices, and vegetables—on human milk production. The evidence supporting the use of certain dietary components as “galactagogues” in some traditional practices to enhance milk production differs. The present article will study the processes by which these foods may affect breastfeeding, taking into account the limitations of previous studies and the need for additional study. In addition, the aim of this study is to elucidate the processes underlying the putative galactogenic properties of various dietary components. While folklore and history suggest that certain foods can promote breastfeeding, thorough scientific research is needed to determine their true effectiveness and safety. The aim of this review is to critically examine the current literature, identify research gaps and provide evidence-based insights into food choices to improve nursing practice. Ultimately, understanding how breastfeeding interacts with maternal nutrition can help moms overcome barriers to breastfeeding and promote their own and their infants’ health and well-being.

Keywords: Dietary Components , Boost Lactation, Herbs, Vegetables, Pulses And Cereals , Milk Production

[This article belongs to International Journal of Nutritions(ijn)]

How to cite this article: Rachana Jagadeesh, Rohit Kumar, Neelesh Kumar Maurya. The Impact of Dietary Components on Lactation: A Critical Review. International Journal of Nutritions. 2024; 01(01):31-36.
How to cite this URL: Rachana Jagadeesh, Rohit Kumar, Neelesh Kumar Maurya. The Impact of Dietary Components on Lactation: A Critical Review. International Journal of Nutritions. 2024; 01(01):31-36. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/ijn/article=2024/view=135926





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Regular Issue Subscription Review Article
Volume 01
Issue 01
Received March 26, 2024
Accepted March 26, 2024
Published March 27, 2024