Studies on Extraction of Flavonoids from the Peel of Pisum Sativum

Year : 2023 | Volume : 01 | Issue : 02 | Page : 17-22
By

    Drishti Dhall

  1. Ishika Gupta

  2. Surya Prakash

  1. Student, Department of Biotechnology, Meerut Institute of Engineering and Technology, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, India
  2. Student, Department of Biotechnology, Meerut Institute of Engineering and Technology, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, India
  3. Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Meerut Institute of Engineering and Technology,, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract

Pisum sativum is commonly known as Pea plant and belongs to Fabaceae family. It is an herbaceous annual plant. Pea pods not only yield an adequate quality of dietary fibre but provide a substantial amount of proteins, sugars, and minerals. Globally, significant quantities of pea residue are generated, an enormous amount of which is used as animal feed. The pea pods consist of an appreciable amount of polyphenols, including phenolic acids such as 5-caffeoylquinic acid and flavanols like catechin and epicatechin. In this experiment, qualitative, quantitative and purification of phytochemicals are studied. In qualitative analysis, saponins, terpenoids, flavonoids and quinines are present based on observation of colour. In quantitative analysis, water extract and ethanolic extracts showed best result of quercetin and kaempferol and their concentrations were found to be 14.0 μg/ml and 11.5 μg/ml. In purification process, quercetin(water extract) and kaempferol(ethanolic extract) concentrations were found to be 17.0 μg/ml and 12.5 μg/ml.

Keywords: Pisumsativum, quercetin, kaempferol, extraction, purification

[This article belongs to International Journal of Biochemistry and Biomolecule Research(ijbbr)]

How to cite this article: Drishti Dhall, Ishika Gupta, Surya Prakash Studies on Extraction of Flavonoids from the Peel of Pisum Sativum ijbbr 2023; 01:17-22
How to cite this URL: Drishti Dhall, Ishika Gupta, Surya Prakash Studies on Extraction of Flavonoids from the Peel of Pisum Sativum ijbbr 2023 {cited 2023 Oct 09};01:17-22. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/ijbbr/article=2023/view=127818

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Regular Issue Subscription Original Research
Volume 01
Issue 02
Received April 10, 2023
Accepted September 1, 2023
Published October 9, 2023