Year : 2022 | Volume : | Issue : 1 | Page : 9-12
By

    Anas Ansari

  1. Divya Kundan

  2. Harsh Mishra

  1. Students, Department of Pharmacy, Meerut Institute of Engineering and Technology, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, India
  2. Students, Department of Pharmacy, Meerut Institute of Engineering and Technology, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, India
  3. Students, Department of Pharmacy, Meerut Institute of Engineering and Technology, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract

The gastrointestinal tract’s (GIT) functionality and health are essential elements that influence animal productivity. Since the management of GIT growth and health involves numerous complicated systems, it is critical to have a better understanding of these interconnections in order to create strategies for modulating GIT functioning and health in the perspective of better animal performance. Within in the animal scientific community, this term of “gut health” has sparked considerable interest. Furthermore, there is no precise definition of gut health and functionality, or how to quantify it. A novel approach to gastrointestinal function and discuss how good gastrointestinal functionality can help animals perform much better and live longer. Diet, effective construction and function of such gastrointestinal membrane, host interactions with the gastrointestinal microbiota, successful absorption of nutrients of feed, and efficient immunological state are the essential components of gastrointestinal functionality addressed in this article. Whereas the connections between such domains are intricate, a number of different approaches are required to establish dietary strategies that will help farm animals become more adaptable to the endogenous and environmental difficulties they will face throughout their productive lives. The objective of this section is to display animal as well as veterinary scientists but also nutritionists with a modern classification of gastrointestinal functionality which can be used to establish a multiple disciplines approach for improving animal health, welfare, and effectiveness even as world’s population continues to increase.

Keywords: Gastrointestinal, Microbiota, Nutrition, Immune system, Functionality, Health, Welfare

[This article belongs to International Journal of Animal Biotechnology and Applications(ijaba)]

How to cite this article: Anas Ansari, Divya Kundan, Harsh Mishra Animal Gastrointestinal Tract in Animals Health ijaba 2022; 8:9-12
How to cite this URL: Anas Ansari, Divya Kundan, Harsh Mishra Animal Gastrointestinal Tract in Animals Health ijaba 2022 {cited 2022 May 29};8:9-12. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/ijaba/article=2022/view=89708/

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Regular Issue Open Access Article
Volume 8
Issue 1
Received June 11, 2022
Accepted May 3, 2022
Published May 29, 2022

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