Antibiotic Resistance: Molecular Mechanisms of Resistance

Open Access

Year : 2023 | Volume :11 | Issue : 1 | Page : 1-8
By

    Sandip Zine

  1. Parth Mehta

  2. Ankita Rai

  3. Sayli Sawant

  1. Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Vivekanand Education Society’s College of Pharmacy, Collector Colony, Chembur, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  2. Student, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Vivekanand Education Society’s College of Pharmacy, Collector Colony, Chembur, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  3. Student, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Vivekanand Education Society’s College of Pharmacy, Collector Colony, Chembur, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  4. Student, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Vivekanand Education Society’s College of Pharmacy, Collector Colony, Chembur, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Abstract

Antibiotics are called as ‘Wonder Drugs’, the miracles of modern sciences. They help combat bacteria and prevent their growth. But due to unmonitored and uncontrolled consumption of these antibiotics, there is an emergence of antibiotic resistance. This has led to a series of downfall in the therapeutic potency and efficacy of many drugs. More and more bacteria are becoming Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR); such highly resistant strains of certain bacteria are called Superbugs. The misuse and overconsumption of many antibiotics, has led to a steep rise in the number of antibiotic-resistant strains at a global level, thus elevating global mortality and morbidity rates. This prompted World health Organisation in 2011 to coin a slogan “No action today, no cure tomorrow”. This review gives a piece of detailed information on the origin, molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, supported by factual data and case studies

Keywords: Superbugs, antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, antivirulence therapy, MDR

[This article belongs to Research & Reviews: A Journal of Microbiology & Virology(rrjomv)]

How to cite this article: Sandip Zine, Parth Mehta, Ankita Rai, Sayli Sawant , Antibiotic Resistance: Molecular Mechanisms of Resistance rrjomv 2023; 11:1-8
How to cite this URL: Sandip Zine, Parth Mehta, Ankita Rai, Sayli Sawant , Antibiotic Resistance: Molecular Mechanisms of Resistance rrjomv 2023 {cited 2023 Jan 19};11:1-8. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/rrjomv/article=2023/view=92432

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Regular Issue Open Access Article
Volume 11
Issue 1
Received November 17, 2020
Accepted November 19, 2020
Published January 19, 2023