Changes of the Function of Interstitial Cells of Cajal and Fecundity During Chronic Salpingitis: Experimental Study

Year : 2024 | Volume :13 | Issue : 01 | Page : 23-26
By

Yong-Chol Hong

Gyong-Rim Kim

Jun-Il Kang

Jong-Hwa Jin

Ji-Yong Jong

U-Il Jong1

  1. Researcher Pyongyang University of Medical Sciences Ryonhwa Dong Pyongyang

Abstract

We have conducted this study to clarify the changes of the function of interstitial cells of Cajal and fecundity in chronic salpingitis white rat models which are made by infecting its vaginal cavity with Chlamydia. Background: Chlamydial infection is a sexually transmitted disease which is caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. 75% of the fallopian tube disease is thought to be due to anamnesis of asymptomatic Chlamydial infection and those who are under 25 years old with risk of Chlamydial infection and other asymptomatic women are recommended to have a medical examination regularly. Experimentally clarifying the functional and morphological changes of oviduct by chlamydial infection which is the cause of infertility will contribute to establish a new treatment way for diagnosing and treating infertility. We have conducted this study to clarify the changes of the function of interstitial cells of Cajal and fecundity in chronic salpingitis white rat models which are made by infecting its vaginal cavity with Chlamydia. Objects and Methods: We anaesthetized female wistar rats with 160-180g in body weight and injected 1×107/50μL Chlamydia into vaginal cavity of each rat to make chronic salpingitis models. 4 weeks after infection, we let male and female rats copulate and examined the intravaginal content to confirm if there is a sperm or vaginal plug and set this day as the first day of pregnancy. The 8th, 13th, 18th day we assessed the function of interstitial cells of Cajal by amplifying and measuring bioelectric potential with microelectrode on oviduct and assessed fecundity by counting the number of fetuses in uterus and judging life or deaths of fetuses. Results: The function of interstitial cells of Cajal and fecundity in chronic salpingitis white rat models were significantly destroyed compared with those in normal.

Keywords: Chlamydial infection, chronic salpingitis, interstitial cell of Cajal, fecundity, rat model

[This article belongs to Research & Reviews : A Journal of Medical Science and Technology(rrjomst)]

How to cite this article: Yong-Chol Hong, Gyong-Rim Kim, Jun-Il Kang, Jong-Hwa Jin, Ji-Yong Jong, U-Il Jong1. Changes of the Function of Interstitial Cells of Cajal and Fecundity During Chronic Salpingitis: Experimental Study. Research & Reviews : A Journal of Medical Science and Technology. 2024; 13(01):23-26.
How to cite this URL: Yong-Chol Hong, Gyong-Rim Kim, Jun-Il Kang, Jong-Hwa Jin, Ji-Yong Jong, U-Il Jong1. Changes of the Function of Interstitial Cells of Cajal and Fecundity During Chronic Salpingitis: Experimental Study. Research & Reviews : A Journal of Medical Science and Technology. 2024; 13(01):23-26. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/rrjomst/article=2024/view=138016




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Regular Issue Subscription Case Report
Volume 13
Issue 01
Received December 2, 2023
Accepted February 2, 2024
Published April 2, 2024