Advancing Public Health Through Vaccination: A Narrative Review of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Immunization Strategies

Year : 2024 | Volume :14 | Issue : 01 | Page : 1-6
By

Vaishnavi Velmani

Sriram Radhakrishnan

  1. Student C.L. Baid Metha College of Pharmacy (Affiliated to The Tamil Nadu Dr. MGR Medical University) Chennai India
  2. Student C.L. Baid Metha College of Pharmacy (Affiliated to The Tamil Nadu Dr. MGR Medical University) Chennai India

Abstract

RSV is a significant factor in causing lower respiratory tract infections in children, especially among infants and toddlers. Different age groups are affected by RSV in distinct ways, specifically affecting young children and elderly. People who are immunocompromised are more susceptible to RSV. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended vaccination doses with the age group to prevent mortality associated with RSV. Signs and symptoms often resemble common cold in coughing, decreased appetite, runny nose, etc. Additionally, RSV not only provides protection to the pregnant mother, but also to the growing fetus. If the mother had taken immunization within the past 14 days of childbirth, the child until his/her 8 months is not necessary to take additional RSV vaccine, as the vaccine taken by mother provides protection for the child. Hospitalizations are mostly required in severe elderly RSV- associated pneumonia. Coordination of immunization strategies, awareness and suitable protocol of administration may help reach out to people at risk of getting RSV infection. Monoclonal antibodies plays an important role in preventing RSV infections. Several ongoing and future studies may help reveal clues towards more advanced immunization practices. Continued research and investment in RSV immunization efforts are crucial for achieving long-term public health goals and reducing the global impact of this infectious disease. Beyond several challenges that hurdle the vaccine development and administration, vaccines are administered and they help in reducing the global burden by preventing RSV-associated hospitalization and mortality in all age groups.

Keywords: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), immunization, monoclonal antibody, vaccines, signs and symptoms, public health, fetal protection.

[This article belongs to Research & Reviews : A Journal of Immunology(rrjoi)]

How to cite this article: Vaishnavi Velmani, Sriram Radhakrishnan. Advancing Public Health Through Vaccination: A Narrative Review of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Immunization Strategies. Research & Reviews : A Journal of Immunology. 2024; 14(01):1-6.
How to cite this URL: Vaishnavi Velmani, Sriram Radhakrishnan. Advancing Public Health Through Vaccination: A Narrative Review of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Immunization Strategies. Research & Reviews : A Journal of Immunology. 2024; 14(01):1-6. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/rrjoi/article=2024/view=144252





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Regular Issue Subscription Review Article
Volume 14
Issue 01
Received March 21, 2024
Accepted March 21, 2024
Published April 24, 2024