Emotional Abilities Among Undergraduate Students of Health Care Professional and Non-professional Courses

Year : 2024 | Volume :14 | Issue : 01 | Page : 19-23
By

Ishwar S. P

Sabarish A

Darshan Devananda

  1. Research Assistant JSS Institute of Speech and Hearing Karnataka India
  2. Assistant Professor JSS Institute of Speech and Hearing Karnataka India
  3. Assistant Professor JSS Institute of Speech and Hearing Karnataka India

Abstract

Emotional Intelligence (EI) also refers to the ability of an individual to perceive, understand, and manage own emotions and others’ emotions. Research reported that individuals with higher EI have better social skills, management skills and effective communication. Education is the most impacting factor in children as they grow and mature by learning new things from the surroundings and academics which influences EI of an individual. Studies on education and emotional intelligence were often seen. Though there is certain relationship between education and EI, studies related to emotional intelligence in health care professions are scanty. Thus, the present study was planned to study the emotional intelligence in professional undergraduate students and compare it between different professional fields.. A study involving 170 undergraduate students who volunteered was conducted, and these participants were separated into two distinct groups. Group 1 consists of 80 professional course students of first to final year from Speech and Hearing physiotherapy and Ayurveda medicine disciplines. From each class, 20 participants participated in the study. Group 2 consists of 90 non-professional course students from first to final year of arts discipline and 30 students from each year participated in the study. The current study utilizes the Schutte Self-reported Emotional Intelligence Test (SSEIT) for the evaluation of emotional intelligence. The results showed highest scores in managing others’ emotions for both the groups. Similarly, the least scores were observed in emotion perception. However, Group 1 participants showed slightly higher scores in all the domains than Group 2 participants. The present study showed professional course students with higher emotional intelligence than non-professional students.

Keywords: Emotional intelligence, professional courses, health professionals, adolescents, self-reported emotional intelligence, managing others’ emotions, effective communication

[This article belongs to Research & Reviews: A Journal of Health Professions(rrjohp)]

How to cite this article: Ishwar S. P, Sabarish A, Darshan Devananda. Emotional Abilities Among Undergraduate Students of Health Care Professional and Non-professional Courses. Research & Reviews: A Journal of Health Professions. 2024; 14(01):19-23.
How to cite this URL: Ishwar S. P, Sabarish A, Darshan Devananda. Emotional Abilities Among Undergraduate Students of Health Care Professional and Non-professional Courses. Research & Reviews: A Journal of Health Professions. 2024; 14(01):19-23. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/rrjohp/article=2024/view=143989




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Regular Issue Subscription Original Research
Volume 14
Issue 01
Received January 20, 2024
Accepted February 9, 2024
Published April 22, 2024