Ecology of Leaf Adaptations in Azardirachta indica A. Juss at Desert Environment

Year : 2024 | Volume :13 | Issue : 01 | Page : 7-11
By

Seema Sen

Rachana Dinesh

  1. Assistant Professor Department of Botany Center of Advanced Study, Jai Narain Vyas University Rajasthan India
  2. Assistant Professor Department of Botany Center of Advanced Study, Jai Narain Vyas University Rajasthan India

Abstract

Azardirachta indica A. Juss is a medicinally important plant belonging to the family Meliaceae. It is widely used during COVID 19 for its anti-inflammatory and antiviral effects for COVID 19 prophylaxis. Although the plant is native to India, but is very much naturalized in tropical and subtropical countries. It is one of the commonly used plant for shelterbelt and wind break system along roadsides also. The present investigation was done to check the adaptive strategies followed by this plant to survive in arid and semiarid region of Rajasthan. Micromorphological characters viz., Stomata type, Stomata Index, Stomatal density, Stomata length and width, Epidermal cell shape and wall pattern with epidermal cell length and width was estimated by leaf Impression method. Micrometry was done using Magnus Pro software fitted on a light microscope of Cannon, Ecophysiological parameters by Li Cor photosynthetic portable system and succulence by method proposed by A. Mantovani (1998), alternative to Delf’s index. Micromorphological variations in young and mature leaves were showed in tabular form for both the leaf surfaces. Mature leaves were observed to be more succulent in comparison to young leaves and there were no marked variations in water use efficiency in the leaves of both young and mature leaves which make it more hospitable to survive in xeric conditions. The research conducted on Azadirachta indica A. Juss explores its adaptation mechanisms in arid and semiarid regions of Rajasthan. Through micromorphological analysis and ecophysiological measurements, the study reveals the plant’s resilience strategies, particularly in terms of leaf characteristics and water use efficiency. These findings contribute to understanding its suitability for diverse environmental conditions, including its potential significance amidst the COVID-19 pandemic for its medicinal properties.

Keywords: Water Use Efficiency, Micromorphological characters, Succulence, Adaxial surface and Abaxial surface.

[This article belongs to Research & Reviews : Journal of Ecology(rrjoe)]

How to cite this article: Seema Sen, Rachana Dinesh. Ecology of Leaf Adaptations in Azardirachta indica A. Juss at Desert Environment. Research & Reviews : Journal of Ecology. 2024; 13(01):7-11.
How to cite this URL: Seema Sen, Rachana Dinesh. Ecology of Leaf Adaptations in Azardirachta indica A. Juss at Desert Environment. Research & Reviews : Journal of Ecology. 2024; 13(01):7-11. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/rrjoe/article=2024/view=145362





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Regular Issue Subscription Original Research
Volume 13
Issue 01
Received March 29, 2024
Accepted April 19, 2024
Published May 7, 2024