Analysing the Compliance of the National Solid Waste Management Related Legislations in Selected Local Government Authorities in Tanzania

Open Access

Year : 2021 | Volume : | Issue : 1 | Page : 1-15
By

    Hussein Mohamed Omar

  1. Saphy Lal Bullu

  1. Law Lecturer, Open Univerisity of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, East Africa
  2. Law Lecturer, Open Univerisity of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, East Africa

Abstract

This study assesses the extent of compliance to the Solid Waste Management Legislations in Tanzania. It is motivated by the fact that more than 15 years have passed since the enactment of some solid waste management related legislations but still on average less than 50% of the generated waste is effectively collected. This study was conducted in selected local Government Authorities in Tanzania. The study guided by legislation requirement for improved waste management services which include coordination roles, waste minimization systems, refuse collection charges availability of waste transfer stations, availability of proper storage containers, and presence of recycling and composting initiatives. The research methodology involved a purposefully selection of 5 local Government authorities of Ilala, Kinondoni, Moshi, Arusha and Dodoma. Questionnaires, different types of observations, in-depth interviews and documentary review formed the research data collection techniques. The study used descriptive analyses for its variable analysis. The findings show that despite having good legislations the compliance level for the Government institutions, private entities and individuals was found to be very poor. To this end the study recommends; Development of the enforcement guideline, National Environmental Management Council take a lead role in driving environmental policy and waste management legislations, Establishment of environmental enforcement unit, establishment of Mobile Environmental tribunals, Promotion of civil society and Individuals engagement, Promoting clarity and understanding of the environmental legislations, Establishment of waste management authority, Minimizing bureaucracy and streamlining legal procedures, Enhancing social network, Capacity Building. It is expected that, the study findings can inform policy makers and enforcement agents on the relevancy of enhancing enforcement strategies for effective waste management in the country.

Keywords: Waste, solid waste, waste management, compliance, local government authority

[This article belongs to National Journal of Environmental law(njel)]

How to cite this article: Hussein Mohamed Omar, Saphy Lal Bullu Analysing the Compliance of the National Solid Waste Management Related Legislations in Selected Local Government Authorities in Tanzania njel 2021; 4:1-15
How to cite this URL: Hussein Mohamed Omar, Saphy Lal Bullu Analysing the Compliance of the National Solid Waste Management Related Legislations in Selected Local Government Authorities in Tanzania njel 2021 {cited 2021 May 21};4:1-15. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/njel/article=2021/view=91540

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References

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Regular Issue Open Access Article
Volume 4
Issue 1
Received November 11, 2020
Accepted December 3, 2021
Published May 21, 2021