Comparative Analysis of Goods and Services Tax Collections in India During COVID-19

Open Access

Year : 2021 | Volume : | Issue : 2 | Page : 8-12
By

    Kumaraswamy Mora

  1. Research Scholar, Badruka College of Commerce and Arts, Kachiguda, Hyderabad. Telangana, India

Abstract

The COVID period is a good lesson to all the categories of society. It is not an exception to the government too. In connection with the collection of revenues in the form of taxes become difficult for the concerned authorities during the pandemic. The collection of Goods and Services Tax (GST) would too be impacted due to the coronavirus spread in the country, this leads the disruptions in the production and economy. In our country, the federal governments are dependent on the collections of indirect and direct taxes. In relation to GST both the governments, central and state lost a lot of revenue collection with the pandemic situation, all most all majority of states got affected due to shortage of revenue. The present paper is going to describe the comparative analysis of Goods and Services Tax of Integrated Goods and Services Tax (IGST), Central Goods and Services Tax (CGST), and State Goods and Services Tax (SGST) for the period of June 2020 to March 2021 with June 2019 to March 2020.

Keywords: Pandemic, GST, IGST, CGST, SGST

[This article belongs to NOLEGEIN Journal of Corporate & Business Laws(njcbl)]

How to cite this article: Kumaraswamy Mora Comparative Analysis of Goods and Services Tax Collections in India During COVID-19 njcbl 2021; 4:8-12
How to cite this URL: Kumaraswamy Mora Comparative Analysis of Goods and Services Tax Collections in India During COVID-19 njcbl 2021 {cited 2021 Dec 15};4:8-12. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/njcbl/article=2021/view=91356

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Regular Issue Open Access Article
Volume 4
Issue 2
Received September 23, 2021
Accepted November 11, 2021
Published December 15, 2021