A Review of Recent Advancements in the Field of Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Joints Made of Aluminium and Magnesium

Open Access

Year : 2024 | Volume :12 | Special Issue : 01 | Page : 134-142
By

P J Lokesh Kumar

S Shankaranarayanan

C Jayabalan

S D Sekar

K Sengottaiyan

R Suresh Kumar

  1. Assistant Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, R.M.K. Engineering College India
  2. Assistant Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, Velammal Engineering College India
  3. Assistant Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, AMET University India
  4. Associate Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, R.M.K. Engineering College India
  5. Assistant Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, R.M.K. Engineering College India
  6. Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering, R.M.K. Engineering College, India

Abstract

Friction stir welding (FSW) stands at the forefront of welding technology, offering a promising avenue for joining dissimilar metals like aluminum and magnesium. These metals, renowned for their exceptional properties such as ductility, thermal conductivity, low density, and impressive weight-to-strength ratios, find wide utility across numerous industrial sectors. However, traditional fusion welding methods often struggle to effectively join aluminum and magnesium due to their disparate physical and chemical characteristics. FSW circumvents these challenges by employing a solid-state welding approach, utilizing frictional heat generated between a rotating tool and the workpieces to create a robust bond without melting the metals. This method sidesteps common issues encountered in fusion welding, such as solidification cracking, porosity, and distortion. In the context of aluminum-magnesium joints, understanding and optimizing FSW process parameters are crucial for achieving desired mechanical properties and mitigating defects. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of FSW for joining aluminum to magnesium, delving into key aspects such as process parameters, mechanical properties of the joints, and common defects encountered during welding. By elucidating these critical factors, researchers and engineers can enhance the quality and reliability of FSW-produced aluminum-magnesium joints, thereby unlocking new possibilities for lightweight, high-performance structures in industries ranging from automotive and aerospace to marine and construction. As FSW technology continues to evolve, its potential for revolutionizing metal joining processes across diverse applications remains both compelling and exciting.

Keywords: Magnesium, Aluminium, Friction stir welding, solid state welding, welding defect

[This article belongs to Special Issue under section in Journal of Polymer and Composites(jopc)]

How to cite this article: P J Lokesh Kumar, S Shankaranarayanan, C Jayabalan, S D Sekar, K Sengottaiyan, R Suresh Kumar. A Review of Recent Advancements in the Field of Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Joints Made of Aluminium and Magnesium. Journal of Polymer and Composites. 2024; 12(01):134-142.
How to cite this URL: P J Lokesh Kumar, S Shankaranarayanan, C Jayabalan, S D Sekar, K Sengottaiyan, R Suresh Kumar. A Review of Recent Advancements in the Field of Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Joints Made of Aluminium and Magnesium. Journal of Polymer and Composites. 2024; 12(01):134-142. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/jopc/article=2024/view=144020

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Special Issue Open Access Review Article
Volume 12
Special Issue 01
Received February 28, 2024
Accepted March 7, 2024
Published April 22, 2024