Competency of Natural Fiber Based Eco-Friendly Friction Lining Composites Over the Conventional Friction Material

Open Access

Year : 2021 | Volume : | Issue : 2 | Page : 57-63
By

    Sandip S. Shirsath

  1. R.N. Yerrawar

  1. Research Scholar, Department of Mechanical Engineering G.H. Raisoni College of Engineering and Management, Maharashtra, India
  2. Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MES College of Engineering, Wadia college campus, Maharashtra, India

Abstract

The Braking system is important system of automobiles and is responsible for providing better performance and safety. A Millions of automobiles are frequently decelerated and stopped at heavy traffic zone. Overall performance of vehicle braking system depends on braking conditions and brake material. All friction based application releases wear products; either gaseous form or particulate matter form and braking system is prime source of non exhaust particulate matter emission. The Friction lining material is composed of various ingredients and its selection is based on experimental trials and fundamental understanding. The number of ingredients decided to achieve best braking performance at different working environments and loading conditions, in terms of the wear rate, friction level and noise level, At present, braking system facing technical challenges related to thermal stability, fade, abnormal noise, wear rate & environmental issues with existing semi metallic, low metallic material and asbestos based friction material. The present work aims to explore the influence of non exhaust particulate matter on human health; environment and focuses on featured eco-friendly friction lining composite materials (FLM) prepared from organic farm waste with desired percentage. This helps to understand the depth of natural fiber in FLM tested with best possible combinations and this found effective through comparative studies. It helps in reducing the load of natural waste disposal and reduces toxic elements at source

Keywords: Friction lining composite material (FLM), Non-Asbestos Organic (NAO), Environmental impact

[This article belongs to Journal of Polymer and Composites(jopc)]

How to cite this article: Sandip S. Shirsath, R.N. Yerrawar Competency of Natural Fiber Based Eco-Friendly Friction Lining Composites Over the Conventional Friction Material jopc 2021; 9:57-63
How to cite this URL: Sandip S. Shirsath, R.N. Yerrawar Competency of Natural Fiber Based Eco-Friendly Friction Lining Composites Over the Conventional Friction Material jopc 2021 {cited 2021 Aug 31};9:57-63. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/jopc/article=2021/view=90177

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Regular Issue Open Access Article
Volume 9
Issue 2
Received June 24, 2021
Accepted August 18, 2021
Published August 31, 2021