The Ethics and Implications of Brain–Computer Interfaces: Enhancing Human Abilities and Redefining Privacy

Year : 2024 | Volume :15 | Issue : 01 | Page : 24-28
By

Riya Choudhary

Sheetal Choudhary

Prakriti Kulshrerstha

Sanjeev Patwa

  1. Student Department of Computer Science and engineering, Mody University of Science and Technology, Laxmangarh Rajasthan India
  2. Student Department of Computer Science and engineering, Mody University of Science and Technology, Laxmangarh Rajasthan India
  3. Student Department of Computer Science and engineering, Mody University of Science and Technology, Laxmangarh Rajasthan India
  4. Associate Professor Department of Computer Science and engineering, Mody University of Science and Technology, Laxmangarh Rajasthan India

Abstract

This study addresses the ethical considerations and social implications of brain–computer interface (BCI) development and integration. BCI, sometimes called a brain-machine interface (BMI) or smart brain, is a direct communication path between the brain and electrical activity and an external device, usually a computer or robotic limb. BCIs are often directed towards researching, mapping, assisting, improving, or correcting human cognitive or sensorimotor functions. The implementation of BCIs varies from non-invasive and partially invasive to invasive, depending on how close the electrodes come to the brain tissue. These revolutionary technologies create direct communication between the brain and external devices, offering unprecedented opportunities to improve human capabilities. The article explores the ethical nuances of BCI and addresses issues such as geoprivacy, data ownership, and potential unauthorized use. As BCIs challenge traditional concepts of privacy, the paper explores how these interfaces can redefine this concept in the digital age. The research aims to promote a balanced debate by ensuring that the ethical dimensions of BCIs are carefully designed to harness their transformative potential while protecting fundamental human values. By examining studies related to BCIs that employ social research methods, we seek to demonstrate the multitude of approaches and concerns from various angles in consideration of BCIs. As this is a review paper there is no analysis incorporated.

Keywords: brain-machine interface (BMI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), EEG signals, electrocorticography (ECoG), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)

[This article belongs to Journal of Computer Technology & Applications(jocta)]

How to cite this article: Riya Choudhary, Sheetal Choudhary, Prakriti Kulshrerstha, Sanjeev Patwa. The Ethics and Implications of Brain–Computer Interfaces: Enhancing Human Abilities and Redefining Privacy. Journal of Computer Technology & Applications. 2024; 15(01):24-28.
How to cite this URL: Riya Choudhary, Sheetal Choudhary, Prakriti Kulshrerstha, Sanjeev Patwa. The Ethics and Implications of Brain–Computer Interfaces: Enhancing Human Abilities and Redefining Privacy. Journal of Computer Technology & Applications. 2024; 15(01):24-28. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/jocta/article=2024/view=140182




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Regular Issue Subscription Review Article
Volume 15
Issue 01
Received February 23, 2024
Accepted March 6, 2024
Published April 5, 2024