Perspectives on ‘Kamsaharitaki’: an Ayurvedic Formulation for COVID-19 related Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS)

Open Access

Year : 2023 | Volume :11 | Issue : 1 | Page : 28-39
By

    Vaibhav Bapat

  1. Anup Pande

  2. Sagar Narode

  3. Surendra Vedpathak

  1. Panchakarma Vaidya, Department of Panchakarma National Institute of Ayurveda, Deemed to be University, Rajasthan, India
  2. Associate Professor, Department of RSBK, Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya and Hospital, Risod, Dist-Washim, Maharashtra, India

Abstract

Background and Aim: Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor (ACE2), together with Transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2), is a protein receptor for SARS-CoV-2 virus in the host subject; expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 reveals the multidimensional character of COVID-19 infection. SARS-CoV-2 Prominently induces pulmonary and systemic injury with other synergistic mechanisms. Preexisting chronic inflammatory conditions markedly sustain and aggravate the severity and cytokine storm. Inflammatory responses are closely linked with COVID-19 severity and complications. Role of Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is crucial and owing the demand of polyherbal combinations with antioxidant potential for their preventive and therapeutic aspects. Ayurveda intended to develop potential immune mechanism in the host while dealing with infectious diseases. ‘Kamsaharitaki’ a polyherbal formulation predominantly indicated in inflammatory conditions targeting multiple systems is found to be most appropriate to restrain Multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS) associated with COVID 19. To support and establish this; phytopharmacological exploration is decisive. Methodology: A keen exploration of in vitro, in vivo studies with electronically published data limited to Pubmed search engine interrelated to phytochemicals and pharmacological properties of each solitary herb along with predefined groups of herbs constituting this formulation is carried out. Results and Conclusion: This revealed presence of numerous phytochemicals with comparable pharmacological properties. Dashmula (group of 10 herbs of this formulation) illustrated statistically significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-platelet (P < 0.05) potentials.

Keywords: Ayurveda, Sars-CoV-2, MIS, cytokine, Phytopharmacology, Herbal.

[This article belongs to Journal of AYUSH: Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy(joayush)]

How to cite this article: Vaibhav Bapat, Anup Pande, Sagar Narode, Surendra Vedpathak , Perspectives on ‘Kamsaharitaki’: an Ayurvedic Formulation for COVID-19 related Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS) joayush 2023; 11:28-39
How to cite this URL: Vaibhav Bapat, Anup Pande, Sagar Narode, Surendra Vedpathak , Perspectives on ‘Kamsaharitaki’: an Ayurvedic Formulation for COVID-19 related Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS) joayush 2023 {cited 2023 Jan 07};11:28-39. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/joayush/article=2023/view=89966

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Regular Issue Open Access Article
Volume 11
Issue 1
Received January 11, 2022
Accepted February 25, 2022
Published January 7, 2023