Effect of Compression Pressure on the Strength and Fuel Properties of Maize Cob Briquettes

Open Access

Year : 2023 | Volume :8 | Issue : 1 | Page : 16-24
By

Sunday Yusuf Kpalo

  1. Senior Lecturer Department of Geography, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Nasarawa State University Keffi Nigeria

Abstract

Biomass can be densified under a high compression pressure or a low compression pressure. The type of raw material, moisture level, particle size, and form typically all influence how much pressure should be used. This study utilized maize cobs and waste paper pulp to produce briquettes which are seen as alternative fuels. The goal was to determine how compression pressure affected the strength and fuel characteristics of the briquettes that were formed. The biomass was mixed together at different ratios and compacted using a manually operated hydraulic piston-press. Different compression pressures of 5, 7 and 10 MPa were applied during densification. The compressive strength of briquettes was determined using a universal testing machine while determination of the higher heating value of the briquette was done using the IKA C2000 Basic bomb calorimeter. Also, burning rate was determined through the combustion of mass of fuel in the air. Results indicated that with increasing compression pressure, density, compressive strength, and higher heating value greatly increased. The rate at which briquettes burned, however, was negatively impacted by increasing compression pressure The burning rate decreases with increasing compression pressure because there are fewer air voids in the briquettes, which limits the amount of mass and heat that can be transferred during combustion. Adequate strength and heating value can be obtained in briquettes compressed at 10 MPa. However, a compression pressure of 7 MPa should suffice for combustion efficiency in terms of burning rate. Findings from this study could improve present agricultural residue densification technology, especially in rural areas where there is dire need of alternative energy.

Keywords: briquettes, burning rate, compression pressure, maize cobs, paper pulp, fuel properties

[This article belongs to International Journal of Renewable Energy and its Commercialization(ijrec)]

How to cite this article: Sunday Yusuf Kpalo. Effect of Compression Pressure on the Strength and Fuel Properties of Maize Cob Briquettes. International Journal of Renewable Energy and its Commercialization. 2023; 8(1):16-24.
How to cite this URL: Sunday Yusuf Kpalo. Effect of Compression Pressure on the Strength and Fuel Properties of Maize Cob Briquettes. International Journal of Renewable Energy and its Commercialization. 2023; 8(1):16-24. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/ijrec/article=2023/view=89925

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Regular Issue Open Access Article
Volume 8
Issue 1
Received June 7, 2022
Accepted June 14, 2022
Published January 7, 2023