Evolution and impact of forensic DNA typing in modern investigation

Year : 2024 | Volume : | : | Page : –
By

Umer Ali

Nabila iqbal

Hafiza Rabia Shafiq

Husnain Ahmad

Arooj Asalm

Asad Abbas

Kashif Nawaz

Sarmad Yousaf

Muhammad Kaleem Ullah Journal

  1. Student Department of Biological Sciences, Tennessee State University Nashville, Tennessee USA
  2. Student Department of Zoology, University of Agriculture Faislabad Pakistan
  3. Student Department of Zoology, University of Agriculture Faislabad Pakistan
  4. Student Department of Zoology, University of okara Okara Pakistan
  5. Student Department of Botony, University of Agriculture Fasialabad Pakistan
  6. Student Department of Biological Sciences, Tennessee State University Nashville, Tennessee USA
  7. Student Department of Biological Sciences, Tennessee State University Nashville, Tennessee USA
  8. Student Department of Chemistry, Government College University Faisalabad Pakistan
  9. Department of Biological Sciences, Tennessee State University Nashville, Tennessee USA

Abstract

The forensic DNA typing, sometimes called DNA fingerprinting. Immigration, paternity, and criminal investigations use forensic DNA typing. Forensic genetics today includes bodily fluid identification, fast DNA analysis, forensic microbiology, and phenotypic profiling.
Human cells contain DNA, a molecular code. Human DNA sequences are 99.9% same in everyone. Every person has almost 0.1% unique DNA. Forensic experts also worry about this 0.1 percent of DNA that is unique. There are several steps undertaken during analysis of forensic DNA. These steps are sample preparation, DNA extraction, amplification, quantification, and DNA profile matching.
Parentage testing, mass tragedies, and crime scene investigations have relied on forensic DNA techniques. An individual’s genetic makeup is built on DNA. DNA can be isolated from living and dead people due to its stability.
Using DNA from crime scene samples, forensic DNA phenotyping shows a person’s biogeography, ancestry, appearance, and age. It is experienced in criminal situations where forensic STR profiling has no match since the donor sample is unknown to the investigators.
In his leukocyte cellular function research, Friedrich Miescher extracted DNA from cellular components and proteins. The precipitate Friedrich found was completely different from protein. He extracted protein using basic composition analysis. Washing the leukocyte with HCL for weeks isolates the nuclei in water/ether. In this research we try to discuss DNA damaging and repairing recycling. Forensic DNA typing has transformed criminal investigations and resolutions. This technique has exonerated the wrongfully condemned, provided strong evidence of guilt for suspects, and identified prospective culprits using DNA databases in unresolved instances. However, alongside these advancements come challenges that must be addressed to fully realize the potential of forensic DNA analysis. One such challenge is the need for education and training to improve the interpretation of complex DNA profiles generated by NGS technologies. As these technologies become more widespread, forensic analysts must be equipped with the knowledge and skills to accurately interpret the wealth of data produced. However, alongside these advancements come challenges that must be addressed to fully realize the potential of forensic DNA analysis. One such challenge is the need for education and training to improve the interpretation of complex DNA profiles generated by NGS technologies.

Keywords: Forensic, Extracted, profiling, investigation, Statiscial. Emerging

How to cite this article: Umer Ali, Nabila iqbal, Hafiza Rabia Shafiq, Husnain Ahmad, Arooj Asalm, Asad Abbas, Kashif Nawaz, Sarmad Yousaf, Muhammad Kaleem Ullah Journal. Evolution and impact of forensic DNA typing in modern investigation. International Journal of Molecular Biotechnological Research. 2024; ():-.
How to cite this URL: Umer Ali, Nabila iqbal, Hafiza Rabia Shafiq, Husnain Ahmad, Arooj Asalm, Asad Abbas, Kashif Nawaz, Sarmad Yousaf, Muhammad Kaleem Ullah Journal. Evolution and impact of forensic DNA typing in modern investigation. International Journal of Molecular Biotechnological Research. 2024; ():-. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/ijmbr/article=2024/view=147954





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Received April 23, 2024
Accepted May 16, 2024
Published May 27, 2024