Wireless EV Charging Station

Year : 2023 | Volume : 01 | Issue : 01 | Page : 30-37
By

    Khumesh Halmare

  1. Nandini Kawade

  2. Anjali Kurkut

  3. Avinash Chavhan

  1. Student, Department of Electrical engineering, NBN Sinhgad School of Engineering, Pune, Maharashtra, India
  2. Student, Department of Electrical engineering, NBN Sinhgad School of Engineering, Pune, Maharashtra,
  3. Student, Department of Electrical engineering, NBN Sinhgad School of Engineering, Pune, Maharashtra,
  4. Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical engineering, NBN Sinhgad School of Engineering, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Abstract

Higher standards for the ease, safety, and dependability of electric vehicle charging have been proposed in recent years due to the fast development of the electrical vehicle (EV) of the new energy business. Resonant inductive coupling is used to charge wirelessly transmitted power. With the aid of Arduino, the transformer may be reconfigured to transfer energy with less energy loss and less strain on the primary circuit. With minimal energy loss, the primary can transmit enough power from the battery to the secondary under the supervision of an IR sensor and relay. The chargeable battery, which is electrically connected to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer, is then supplied with electricity. Buses might be charged when they wait at the bus station for shuttle bus services. It may also be used in parking lots for rental taxis. As a result, electric buses only require a small amount of power to reach the next stop. This results in a smaller battery life and significantly lower costs for electric vehicles. With the use of this technology, charging stations may be used effectively for pre-planned routes and stops, cutting down on charging time. Advances in sensing technology and display units make electric vehicles more dependable even in adverse weather conditions like rain and snow.

Keywords: Electrical Vehicle, Resonant inductive charging, Arduino Consumption, Time of Charging.

[This article belongs to International Journal of Electronics Automation(ijea)]

How to cite this article: Khumesh Halmare, Nandini Kawade, Anjali Kurkut, Avinash Chavhan Wireless EV Charging Station ijea 2023; 01:30-37
How to cite this URL: Khumesh Halmare, Nandini Kawade, Anjali Kurkut, Avinash Chavhan Wireless EV Charging Station ijea 2023 {cited 2023 Nov 28};01:30-37. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/ijea/article=2023/view=127561

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Regular Issue Subscription Review Article
Volume 01
Issue 01
Received June 14, 2023
Accepted August 4, 2023
Published November 28, 2023