Journal of Thermal Engineering and Applications

ISSN: 2349-8994

Editors Overview

jotea maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

Open Access
Special Issue
Topic

A review of turbulent flow

Abstract Submission Deadline : November 30, 2023

Manuscript Submission Deadline : December 25, 2023

Special Issue Description

Fluid motion known as turbulent flow is characterized by erratic fluctuations in pressure and flow rate. Unlike a laminar flow, which happens when a fluid flows in parallel layers without any interruption between those layers, it does not. Turbulence is frequently seen in commonplace phenomena like surf, swiftly moving rivers, billowing storm clouds, and chimney smoke. The majority of fluid flows in nature and those produced by engineering are turbulent. Excessive kinetic energy overcomes the dampening effect of the fluid’s viscosity, causing turbulence in certain areas of a fluid flow. Turbulence is frequently observed in low-viscosity fluids as a result. Generally speaking, in a turbulent flow, unsteady vortices of various sizes arise and interact, which causes drag from friction effects to increase. This makes pumping fluid through a pipe more energy-intensive. Turbulence is frequently seen in commonplace phenomena like surf, swiftly moving rivers, billowing storm clouds, and chimney smoke. The majority of fluid flows in nature and those produced by engineering are turbulent. Excessive kinetic energy overcomes the dampening effect of the fluid’s viscosity, causing turbulence in certain areas of a fluid flow. Turbulence is frequently observed in low-viscosity fluids as a result. Generally speaking, in a turbulent flow, unsteady vortices of various sizes arise and interact, which causes drag from friction effects to increase. This makes pumping fluid through a pipe more energy-intensive. The dimensionless Reynolds number, or the proportion of kinetic energy to viscous damping in a fluid flow, can be used to anticipate when turbulence will start to occur. However, thorough physical analysis of turbulence has long been resisted, and the interactions within turbulence result in an extremely complex phenomenon. Turbulence, according to Richard Feynman, is the most significant classical physics conundrum. Numerous sectors are impacted by turbulence intensity, including fish ecology, air pollution, precipitation, and climate change.

Keywords

Fluid motion, Reynolds number, Viscosity fluids, Turbulence, Viscous damping

Manuscript Submission information

Manuscripts should be submitted online via the manuscript Engine. Once you register on APID, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline.
All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the email address:[email protected] for announcement on this website.
Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a Double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for the submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page.

Participating journals: