Effects of Deficit Irrigation on Tomato (Galila 555) Yield and Water Productivity in Silte Zone, Rift Valley, Ethiopia

Year : 2022 | Volume : | Issue : 1 | Page : 1-7
By

    Kedrala Wabela

  1. Tagesse Bekele

  2. Mulgeta Abebo

Abstract

Irrigated agricultures becoming main concern and strongly recognized to ensure the food security. Deficit irrigation is main strategy to improve water and crop productivity. This study was conducted for two consecutive years (2010 E.C–2012 E.C) to determine the sensitive growth stage effect on tomato yield for water stress and improve water productivity in misrak silti Woreda, Silte Zone, Ethiopia. There experiment has six deficit irrigation levels of treatments plus farmer practice and were arranged in RCB design replicated three times. All agronomic practices were used as farmer’s management ways. Irrigation water requirement of tomato was determined by using cropwat 8.0 model and manual renguage was installed to record daily rainfall of the experimental site. This study show that deficit irrigation different growth stages had significantly affected tomato yield at (p≤0.05). The highest yield (60.06 ton/ha) was obtained from T1 (100% ETc IDML) while minimum yield (45.55 ton/ha) was from T6 (50% ETc D). High irrigation water use efficiency (12.01 kg/m3 ) was recorded in T5 (75% mid stage). Therefore, It was recommended to demonstrate on farmers field T5 (75% of ETc at Mid stage) and T4 (75% of ETc at Development stage) as optional to save scarce irrigation water in the study area.

Keywords: Crop growth stages, Crop water requirement, Deficit irrigation and Water Productivity

[This article belongs to International Journal of Plant Biotechnology(ijpb)]

How to cite this article: Kedrala Wabela, Tagesse Bekele, Mulgeta Abebo Effects of Deficit Irrigation on Tomato (Galila 555) Yield and Water Productivity in Silte Zone, Rift Valley, Ethiopia ijpb 2022; 8:1-7
How to cite this URL: Kedrala Wabela, Tagesse Bekele, Mulgeta Abebo Effects of Deficit Irrigation on Tomato (Galila 555) Yield and Water Productivity in Silte Zone, Rift Valley, Ethiopia ijpb 2022 {cited 2022 Apr 02};8:1-7. Available from: https://journals.stmjournals.com/ijpb/article=2022/view=89846/

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References

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Regular Issue Open Access Article
Volume 8
Issue 1
Received March 12, 2022
Accepted March 21, 2022
Published April 2, 2022